No, really?

Sep. 25th, 2017 01:56 pm
[personal profile] oursin

Dept of, did you do any research?

That Uber vs TfL thing, with TfL refusing to renew their license - okay, I do not use Uber (I am probably not their target market) and everything I hear about it makes me deeply suspicious - but when I read various articles claiming that London black cab drivers are the trad white working class, I wonder how often, if ever, any of these people have ridden in a black cab. Because in my limited and anecdotal experience, finding a Trad London Cabbie who will give you his Salty Cockney Opinions whether you want him to or not, is not the default at all.

This article about Some Artist's exhibition on what he calls 'pseudo-Georgian architecture' in the UK and dates to the 1970s.

Marvel at a London Waitrose – “the pearl of Holloway Road”, according to Bronstein’s caption – with a cupola-crowned tower floating above its entrance. That oddly proportioned line of columns, running above the shopfront windows, suggest the architect once glimpsed a photograph of Vicenza, but not for long enough.
I know that Waitrose and shop there regularly and I am old enough to remember when it was Jones Brothers, by that time part of the John Lewis Partnership, but dating from an era when suburban department stores were built as retail palaces - as far as I can see, dates back to the 1890s.

***

Dept of, is that really the solution? PETA co-founder says we should stop wearing wool. I cannot help feeling that if there is no longer any economic reason for rearing, even if 'sheep are so gentle, they’re so dear!' they are likely to vanish from the face of the earth except in zoos (to which I imagine PETA are also opposed). Might not doing something about introducing legislation for more humane shearing practices be a better use of their time and energies?

Baaaaack

Sep. 24th, 2017 09:39 pm
[personal profile] oursin

As our flight was not until after lunch, this morning after we'd packed and put our luggage in store we went to the Hipolit House: more historical domestic interiors, plus exhibition on the actress Antonina Hoffman and on theatre/acting more generally in C19th. Rather interesting.

Of the journey, not a great deal to be said except for the enormous distances walked within airports.

Anyway, ome agen.

The rain hath rainedeth every day

Sep. 23rd, 2017 05:03 pm
[personal profile] oursin

But nonetheless there has been sightseeing.

I already mentioned Rynek Underground.

The Mehoffer House, which is an artist's house, pehaps more interesting for the interiors than the art, but with an ace cafe, the Meho Cafe.

The National Museum - there are lots of branches, we went to the main building, which seemed mostly arts and crafts + the Lady with the Ermine.

There is probably more to see than we saw at Wawel Hill, but we did the State Rooms and the Royal Private Apartments of the Royal Palace, and the cathedral. Must remark that dwelling in marble halls, or at least spending several hours walking/standing on floors of that substance, does my lower back thing no favours.

We did an organised tour to the Wieliczka Salt Mine: very impressive. (Much more spectacular than the one in Cheshire which is now an archive store.)

Today we went to Kazimierz, which on reflection, was not, being Saturday, the ideal day to do so - had intended going earlier in the week but ran out of time/energy.

There have also been visits to a number of churches, which after a while tend to run together - lotsa baroque.

(no subject)

Sep. 23rd, 2017 04:45 pm
[personal profile] tree_and_leaf
Belated happy birthday, [personal profile] nanila!

August booklog

Sep. 23rd, 2017 01:38 pm
[personal profile] wychwood
125. The Cat's Eye and 127. Helen Vardon's Confession - R Austin Freeman ) Not exactly Freeman's finest, but there are some nice bits tucked away here.


126. Kushiel's Dart - Jacqueline Carey ) I still think this book is really messed up, but the plot just about makes up for it.


128. Trouble and Her Friends - Melissa Scott ) Mostly interesting as a kind of historical curiosity, but if you like cyberpunk it's definitely worth a look.


129. Shadow Man - Melissa Scott ) Lots of cool gender stuff in this one, but I really loved the story about building for liberation that it surrounded.


130. Temeraire - Naomi Novik ) The simplest and also I think best of Novik's novels so far; nothing else she's written is quite this adorable.


131. The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle ) I dunno, I love these less than I used to.


132. Curse of Chalion - Lois McMaster Bujold ) Remains one of my consistent favourites.


The Commonweal books - Graydon Saunders ) I wish more people were reading these, because I love them. And also that he would publish the next one, because I want to read it.


136. The Witch of Syracuse - Dorothy J Heydt ) These are pretty good, but not exceptional; on the other hand, they're free to download, so you could definitely try them!


Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet, books 2 and 3 ) I like these, and I like what Coates is trying to do, but I'm not sure how he's going to get there! And it's an awkward mixture of elements, at times.


139. Speak Its Name - Kathleen Jowitt ) A sweet little romance, with lots of student Christian politics thrown into the mix. Fab.


140. Servant of the Underworld - Aliette de Bodard ) This is more like the de Bodard I found in the short stories! Will be reading the sequel.

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